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Study Abroad at Udzungwa Mountains National Park
Study Abroad at Udzungwa Mountains National Park

Brian Orland

A profile photo of Brian Orland
Distinguished Professor of Landscape Architecture
Email
boo1@psu.edu
Phone Number
814.865.9511
Office Address
121 Stuckeman Family Building
Education

BA (Hons in Architecture), University of Manchester (1974) BArch, University of Manchester (1976) MLA, University of Arizona (1982)  Architectural Registration, ARCUK (1977)

Research

Ongoing Funded Research:

2013, Brantley, S. (PI) Orland and others (Investigators) Using the Susquehanna - Shale Hills CZO to Project from the Geological Past to the Anthropocene Future.  National Science Foundation.  $33,000 (Student support)

2013, Ram, N., B. Orland, S. Osthoff, M. Ballora (Co-PIs), Playing the Archive.  Penn State Institute for Arts and Humanities.  $7,500

2013, Royer, M., B. Orland, S. Smith (Co-PIs), Greening the Lower Susquehanna.  National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. $1,456,276

2012, Echols, S. (PI) S. Clark, B. Gray, B. Orland, R. Ready, K. Saacke-Blunk, J. Shortle, C. Duffy.  Center for Green Infrastructure and Stormwater Management.  Environmental Protection Administration. $2,173,026

2011, Arthur, M.(PI) K. Brasier, D. Miller, B. Orland, E. Prins, Co-InvestigatorsMarcellus Matters: Engaging Adults in Science and Energy (EASE)National Science Foundation.  $2,541,418.

2010, Orland, B., T. Lang, N. Ram, K. Houser and J. Smyth, Co-Investigators,  Occupant Behavior and Energy Saving.  Component of H. Foley (PI)  Greater Philadelphia Regional Innovation Cluster for Energy Efficient Buildings,  US Dept of Energy.  $1,306,000 of $129m total. 

2010, Orland, B. and L. Gorenflo (Co-PIs)  Habitat, Hunger, Health—Human and Biodiversity Needs Where Parks and People Meet: Udzungwa Mountains National Park, Tanzania. Private foundation support, $250,000

Brian has been at Penn State since 2000.  Before that, from 1982 until 2000 he was Professor of Landscape Architecture and Coordinator of the Imaging Systems Laboratory at the University of Illinois.  During 1989 and 1996 he was a Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Melbourne, Australia.  He was a Faculty Fellow at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications in 1998-9.

Professional Background: A registered architect since 1977, he has worked in private practice in the United Kingdom, in East Africa and in Central America. Practicing in landscape architecture and planning since 1981, his work has included urban redevelopment in economically-devastated East St. Louis, USA; and tourism development planning in the rich cultural contexts of Northern India.

Research: Interests include environmental perception and the computer modeling of environmental impacts.  Studies have included the impacts of highway development, of insect pest impacts and logging on national forests, and of the effects of military training activities on natural and rural landscapes.   In the early 1980s he was one of the first to adopt microcomputer-based image capture technology as a tool in the systematic investigation of public perceptions of an array of environmental management issues.  He developed image processing algorithms for the synthesis of ground-level imagery showing the effects of progressive insect damage in national forests in Alaska, Utah, New Mexico and Oregon.  In the early 1990s he developed a data-driven forest visualization tool for forest management, capable of representing forest landscapes at unprecedented scale, that has been widely applied to natural and commercial forest management in the United States, Finland and New Zealand. Recent work has focused on the evolution of urban systems (US National Science Foundation), the assessment of climate change impact on regional landscapes (US Environmental Protection Agency), and the influences of forest bio-physical characteristics on perceived fire hazard (US Forest Service).

His interests continue to focus on the role environment plays in people's well-being and the development of visualization and analysis tools that support that exploration.

Current funded research includes studies of the effects of natural gas exploration and extraction in Northern Pennsylvania on human health, with Tim Murtha and faculty in disciplines including Theatre, Education, Rural Sociology, Geosciences, and Geography, funded by NSF; as part of a major research hub on energy efficient building, funded by the US Department of Energy; and studies of public perceptions of stormwater management practices, with Stuart Echols and colleagues from several other departments, funded by US-EPA and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. With Larry Gorenflo, he conducts research and service-learning in Tanzania on  reconciling the needs for economic, health and social development in a growing human community alongside a national park of exceptional biodiversity conservation value.  In addition, he co-directs StudioLab (studiolab.psu.edu) with Nilam Ram, professor of Human Development and Family Studies, an inter-college arts-science collboratory.

Current Teaching

Brian teaches design workshops focused on topics related to his current research—recently planning and design responses to Marcellus shale gas development in Pennsylvania.  The class, initiated in 2011, followed a highly structured “design rule”-based approach to design involving much GIS analysis.  Addressing the many issues concurrently involved in Marcellus development forces students to pursue design as an intellectual task of designing rules and then carefully constructing analyses of their outcomes and implications, in turn leading to reliable and defensible processes in design and planning .  Students conduct their own studies to apply the emerging rules at various scales within the landscape, the results of which are becoming available on-line as part of a “MarcellusByDesign” website -- marcellusbydesign.psu.edu.

He also teaches colloquia and seminars, currently addressing "Between City", the landscape in which nealry 50% of the world's population still lives, taking care of the clean water, air and food needs of our growing urban centers.

Honors and Awards

2013, Elected Fellow, Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture

2012, Distinguished Professor of Landscape Architecture, Pennsylvania State University

2012, Outstanding Administrator Award, Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture

2011, Undergraduate Program Leadership award, Pennsylvania State University

2011-12, Faculty Fellow, Pennsylvania State University Social Science Research Institute
2010, Named in “Most Admired Educators of 2010” Design Intelligence
2009, Honorary Scientist, Rural Development Administration, The Republic of Korea
2002, Award of Merit, American Society of Landscape Architects. Taj Mahal Cultural Heritage District Development Plan (with V. Bellafiore, T. Harkness, A. Sinha, K. McCown)
1999, Outstanding Faculty, College of Fine and Applied Arts, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
1999, Elected Fellow, American Society of Landscape Architects
1995, Outstanding Educator, Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture
1995, Public Service Award, American Society of Landscape Architects, Illinois Chapter
1994, Distinguished Service Award, American Society of Landscape Architects, Illinois Chapter

Books/Book Chapters/Reports

Refer to Curriculum Vitae posted on website

Articles and Publications

Refer to Curriculum Vitae posted on website

Funded Research and Projects

2013, Brantley, S. (PI) Orland and others (Investigators) Using the Susquehanna - Shale Hills CZO to Project from the Geological Past to the Anthropocene Future"  National Science Foundation.  $33,000 (Student support)

2013, Ram, N., B. Orland, S. Osthoff, M. Ballora (Co-PIs), Playing the Archive.  Penn State Institute for Arts and Humanities.  $7,500

2013-16, Royer, M., B. Orland, S. Smith (Co-PIs), Greening the Lower Susquehanna.  National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. $1,456,276

2012-16, Echols, S. (PI) S. Clark, B. Gray, B. Orland, R. Ready, K. Saacke-Blunk, J. Shortle, C. Duffy.  Center for Green Infrastructure and Stormwater Management.  US Environmental Protection Administration. $2,173,026

2011-14, Orland, B., T. Lang, N. Ram, K. Houser and J. Smyth, Co-Investigators. Occupant Behavior and Energy Efficiency: Well-being, Intervention and Energy Saving Behavior. Component of H. Foley (PI) Greater Philadelphia Regional Innovation Cluster for Energy Efficient Buildings, US Dept of Energy. $1,300,000 of $129m total.

2011-15, Arthur, M.(PI) K. Brasier, D. Miller, B. Orland, E. Prins, Co-Investigators, Marcellus Matters: Engaging Adults in Science and Energy (EASE), National Science Foundation. $2,541,418.

2010-13, Orland, B., M. Bose and M. Sliwinski, Co-Investigators, Interaction of Building Environmental Factors and Human Health. Component of H. Foley (PI) Greater Philadelphia Regional Innovation Cluster for Energy Efficient Buildings, US Dept of Energy. $600,000 of $129m total.

2010, Sliwinski, M. and B. Orland (Co-PIs), Environmental and psychosocial risk regulators of stress in time and context. Penn State University Marcellus Shale Initiative. $65,881

2010-16, Orland, B. and L. Gorenflo (Co-PIs) Habitat, Hunger, Health—Human and Biodiversity Needs Where Parks and People Meet: Udzungwa Mountains National Park, Tanzania. Private foundation support, $250,000

Presentations and Exhibitions

Refer to Curriculum Vitae posted on website

Service

Brian served as Stuckeman School Director from January 2009 to June 2010, having served as Landscape Architecture Department Head from 2000 to 2008.  He has now returned to the more rational lifestyle of Professor. He has been active in educational leadership at the national level.  From 2003-2005 he was a representative to the national Landscape Architecture Body of Knowledge Task Force and in 2006 was a principal author for the report.  LABOK is being used widely to help develop new landscape architecture programs.   He has served on and chaired several accreditation teams.