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Lecture: Christine Ten Eyck, 2016 Bracken Lecturer

Wednesday, March 23, 2016 -
6:00pm to 7:30pm
Stuckeman Jury Space

On Wednesday, March 23, 2016 at 6:00 p.m., the Department of Landscape Architecture's 2016 John R. Bracken Lecturer, Christine Ten Eyck will deliver a lecture as part of the Stuckeman School lecture series. This event is free and open to the public.

NOTE: The Department of Landscape Architecture will provide Pennsylvania Clock Hour certificates (1 total hour) for any PA-DE ASLA members who attend this education program.

Christine Ten Eyck is founding principal and a key collaborator in the design and management of all projects for Ten Eyck Landscape Architects (TELA). The studio’s broad range of work is marked by a keen sensitivity to place and passion for human and ecological well-being. Ten Eyck and TELA were among the first to respond to the need for water conservation by integrating water harvesting technologies and xeric planting to create enriching outdoor environments with a contemporary native aesthetic.

Ten Eyck’s approach engages the unique cultures and ecoregions of the Texas, demonstrating her desire and ability to engage the specific opportunities and constraints of any given location. Drawing upon her intuition, knowledge, and experience, Ten Eyck’s designs continue to respond to context, celebrate native ecologies, promote water conservation, and utilize local materials to create enriching, high-performance landscapes that stimulate the senses.

Ten Eyck received her Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from Texas Tech University. She became a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) in 2003 and is a registered landscape architect in Arizona, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Texas. She is also an appointed advisor on the State Department’s and U.S. General Services Administration’s National Register of Peer Professionals. Committed to advancing both landscape architectural practice and education, Ten Eyck has lectured at various conferences and institutions, including Stanford University, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Arizona and Arizona State University, the Urban Land Institute’s 2009 ‘A Drier West’ Conference, and was the keynote speaker for the 2013 Washington State ASLA Conference and the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects in 2011.

Awards recognizing Ten Eyck’s contributions to landscape architecture as an advocate for sustainability and landscape authenticity include the United States Senate Congressional Commendation for Historic Preservation, National Trust for Historic Preservation Landscape Architecture Award, Cities Alive Green Roof and Wall Award of Excellence, Arizona Forward Environmental Excellence Awards, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Chief of Engineers Award of Excellence, in addition to numerous national and state chapter awards from the American Society of Landscape Architects. The 2009 ASLA Professional Awards jury described the Arizona State University Biodesign Institute “an authentic example of sustainability. The vernacular planting palette and reuse of water is raised to a more poetic level.”

Ten Eyck’s design approach, aesthetic, and innovation in the realm of sustainability have received attention in the published world. Selected books featuring her studio’s work include, The Sustainable Sites Handbook (2012), Private Paradise (2011), Tomorrow’s Garden (2011), Design for a Vulnerable Planet (2011), The Desert Home (2002), Healing Gardens (1999), and Designing for the Future (1996). Selected publications include Landscape Architecture Magazine, Martha Stewart Living, Mountain Living, Vogue, Sunset Magazine, Texas Architect, The New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal.

For more information visit the Ten Eyck Landscape Architects website: http://www.teneyckla.com/

Photo of Christy Ten Eyck standing in front of blooming trees
Overhead photo of twisting paths and extensive green spaces in The New Parkland in Dallas, TX
Overhead view of landscape architecture project that integrates water into public space